Wang Gongxin

wang_gongxin_theotherruleinpingpong_2014

The Other Rule in Ping Pong, 2014 by Wang Gongxin
3-channel synchronized video installation, single channel sound.

WANG GONGXIN (China) b.1960 has emphasised the sculptural in his work for LANDSEASKY by incorporating objects into his projections and spatially considered screen arrangements. In The Other Rule in Ping Pong, Gongxin synchronises two wall projections and one monitor to construct a simulated ping-pong game in screen space. The ball appears to move with speed from wall projection to monitor to wall projection, implied by rhythmic audio cues describing the ball’s movement. The conventional expectation of the game and the balls movement is ruptured by unexpected behaviours. The perception of the space (built in the relationship between the projections and monitor) is both constructed and subsequently deconstructed with conflicting rules.

Gongxin is a first-generation Chinese video artist, pioneering video installation practice since the early 1990s. Gongxin has exhibited widely, including international exhibitions at the Asia Society Museum New York, Platform China, Arrow Factory Beijing, Shanghai Gallery of Art, Beijing Center for the Arts, National Art Museum of China, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Ullens Center for Contemporary Art Beijing, Mori Art Museum Tokyo, Long March Space Beijing, Zendai Museum of Modern Art Shanghai, Victoria and Albert Museum London, National Gallery of Australia.

from this exhibition

Wang Gongxin

22/3/2013 - 26/4/2013 ,  MAAP SPACE

MAAP's current exhibition in Brisbane continues a focused series of leading media artists. Wang Gongxin has a significant place in contemporary Chinese art history. As a senior first generation video artist in China, Wang has produced an accomplished body of work over the past twenty years and has had great influence on a younger generation of artists within China. Trained as a painter, Wang Gongxin moved into video and photography after an extended time living in New York during the late 80’s and returning to live in Beijing in 1994. Working across media, Wang ... Read More